Pain Management

Cervical, thoracic, and lumbar epidurals:
These are targeted injections of anti-inflammatory medication that relieve pain, numbness, and tingling caused by pinched nerves originating from the spine. This condition is well known as sciatica when referring to the lumbar spine.

Selective nerve root blocks:
A specific injection containing a numbing medication is used to help determine what specific nerve or nerves are causing a patient's radiating arm or leg pain.

Facet joint injections:
A strong anti-inflammatory medication is used to help relieve pain associated with the joints that run along the back of the spinal column. These joints can be a source of neck and back pain.

Radiofrequency ablation (Rhizotomy):
Heat is used to disrupt the nerves that supply sensation to the facet joints described above.

Stellate ganglion blocks/lumbar sympathetic blocks:
These are specialized injections of an anesthetic medication that can help to diagnose and relieve a specific type of nerve pain in the arms or legs.

Lumbar discography:
This is a diagnostic procedure that can help to determine if the discs in the spine are responsible for a patient's low back pain. It also determines what specific discs are the source of pain.

Spinal cord stimulator trials:
This is a procedure that can help provide long-term relief from low back and radiating nerve pain in the leg and foot when other treatment options fail to help. It does this by blocking pain signals from traveling from the spinal cord to the brain, and replacing the pain with a non-painful vibratory sensation.

Percutaneous disc decompression (nucleoplasty):
A minimally invasive procedure that uses a probe to vaporize disc material. This relieves the pressure within the disc and helps alleviate low back pain due to a disc herniation and any pinched nerves due pressure from the herniation.

Joint injections:
An anti-inflammatory medication can be placed within the joint spaces of various parts of the body, including the shoulder, hip, and knee to help reduce swelling and pain.

Trigger point injections:
Trigger points are painful nodules that can form in the muscles from repeated strain and injury. Injections of an anesthetic, and at times, an anti-inflammatory, can help to relieve this type of pain.

Viscosupplementation injections:
This is a clear, gel-like fluid that is injected into the joint spaces of the knees. A series of these injections can be very helpful in relieving pain and stiffness associated with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Shoulder, elbow, Carpal Tunnel, and bursa injections:
These are simple in-office procedures that involve -injecting an anti-inflammatory medication along painful structures including the rotator cuff tendons, elbow tendons, and fluid filled sacs that can become inflamed.

Platelet-rich plasma injections:
This in-office technique has gained popularity as a treatment option for certain musculoskeletal injuries involving ligaments, tendons, and cartilage. A patient's own blood is a rich source of growth factors that can help accelerate the healing process. These growth factors can be separated from the rest of the blood, and injected back into the patient's body along the areas of injury to help the patient heal faster.